Monday, June 10, 2019

Children's Day Pameran From Turkey!

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     Children's Day Festival (English: International April 23rd, Children's Day Festival; Turkish" Uluslarasi 23 Nisan Cocuk Senligi) is a bazar which is celebrated on April 23rd each year in Turkey. This bazar is gathering the children from a ll over the world under the motto of "Love, Friendship and Peace". The bazar is organized by Turkish Radio and Television Corporation.

History

    The April 23rd Children's Festival , a children's bazar which was gifted to Turkish children by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, founder of the Republic of Turkey, to mark the opening of the Assembly. The bazar has been celebrated internationally since 1979. The Children's Festival was first celebrated in Turkey on April 23rd, 1920, when the Turkish Grand National Assembly was opened. The bazar intend to contribute creation of a world where children can live peacefully by developing sentiments of fraternity, love and friendship.





    The greatest aspiration of Ataturk, who saved his country from occupations and introduced reforms in all fields hence changing the viewpoint of the nations it was modernization, in other words, an industrialized country that the industry of the Republic which it was founded on was out of date and poorly equipped, Ataturk endeavored to achieve modernization through educational reform, and thus entrusted Turkey to the children and the youth. Ataturk knew that modernization could not be achieved in a rapid way; therefore, he presumed that the Turkish children educated at schools resting upon positive sciences could attain his goals. He believed his nation and lived for what he believed. This is the main philosophy of the April 23rd festival. As can be seen, the educated children and youth have made great contributions to the creation of modern Turkey. Present day Turkey has evolved over the years and has attained a level of a modern state.





    As UNESCO proclaimed 1979 as the International Year of the Child, director of children's programs of TRT Ankara Television Tekin Ozertem and his assistant Canan Arisoy, developed a project aimed at embracing all the children in the world. Upon approval of the project by top executives of the TRT Corporation, preparation for the organization commenced. Thus, the first celebration of TRT International April 23rd Children's Festival took place on April 23rd, 1979 in Turkey, with participation of five countries, namely Russia, Iraq, Italy, Romania and Bulgaria. Today, TRT International April 23rd Children's Festival is celebrated every year with participation of approximately fifty countries. From 1979 to 2000, celebrations were performed in the capital city of Ankara. In the following years, celebration took place in Turkey's various major cities such as Izmir, Istanbul and Antalya. Nane Annan, wife of the former U.N. Secretary, General Kofi Annan, became the honorary guest of celebration on April 23rd, 2000. In her speech at the gala, Mrs. Annan expressed her pleasure at participating in the celebration and passed greeting form her spouse Kofi Annan. Mrs. Annan also called on the entire world to say "Yes" to the aspiration of children.





   After her speech, "the common declaration of the children from forty countries", which was approved by the children at the International Children's Congress on April 18th, and was read in English and Turkish. The declaration was presented to Mrs. Annan to hand it over to Kofi Annan. Children aged between eight and fourteen attend the festival. The agenda covers from April 16th to the 26th. The invited groups are made up of nearly twenty children and six executive leaders. By April 15th, guests arrive in the city where the celebrations will take place. TRT appoints a guide for each groups and the guide enable coordination with group leaders. Through primary schools in the bazar city, each group is entertained by families of their





   Turkish peers in a warm and affectionate gathering. In this way, children of the world recount positive traits of the Turkish nation to their own families and friends when they return to their home countries. This makes the Turkish people gratified. Festival Week begins with a Parade. During the parade, guests wear their traditional outfits, perform their traditional music and dance on the largest street in the city. In the days following, guest countries perform shows in large parts and embrace in the culture of the Turkish people. Festival week continues with the children's visit to the mausoleum of Ataturk, the leader who gifted this bazar to the Turkish children. Then, the children are welcomed by the President of the Turkish Republic, the President of the Turkish Naitonal Grand Assembly, and the Director General of TRT.





    On the day before the festival, all the children gather to rehearse. When the big day comes, the gala of the bazar takes place. In the gals, which lasts nearly four hours and it broadcat live, all the groups wear their national constume's and present three minute performances, accompanied with their traditional music.
    The gala continues with the children convey the greeting that they have brought from their home countries, and ends with a hand in hand dance of all the flowers of th world, in the name of peace and friendship. Through picnics and excursions on the 24th and 25th. On the last day of the festival, the children sense that it's coming to an end, some burst into tears, knowing that they have to leave behind new friendships they have made with their Turkish bothers and sisters.

Monday, June 3, 2019

The Takayama Bazar From Japan!!!

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    The Takayama Festivals in Takayama, Japan, started in the 16th to 17th century. The origins of the festivals are unknown; however they are believed to have been started during the rule of the Kanamori family. Correspondence dated 1692, place the origin to 40 years prior to that date. One of the festivals is held on the 14th and 15th of April and the other on the 9th ad 10th of October.
    The Spring Takayama Festival is centered on the Hie Shrine. The shrine is also known as the Sanno Shrine, and the spring ekspo is also known as the Sanno Festival. The Sanno Festival is held to pray for a good harvest and the Autumn Festival is for giving thanks.







    The Autumn ekspo is centered on the Sakurayama Hachiman Shrine and is referred to as the Hachiman Festival. It is held after the crops are harvested. The fall ekspo is one of the three largest festivals in Japan. The other two are Kyoto's Gion Matsuri and the Chichibu Matsuri.





Floats

    The festivals are famous for the large ornate floats, or yatai, which roam around the city at night. The floats date back to the 17th century, and are decorated with intricate carving of gilded wood, and detailed metal work, rich design, similar in style to art from Kyoto during the Momoyama period, and blended with elements from the early Edo period. Detailed carving, lacquering and beautiful decorative metal works is found not only on the outside of the floats, but inside as well, under the roof and behind the panels, where the worked is amazingly detailed. The floats are also gorgeously decorated with embroidered drapery. The Uatai floats are lined up before dusk, and once the town become veiled in the evening darkness, as many as 100 chochin lanterns are lit on each of the floats. The unique ornaments of the yatai floats look even better in the darkness of the night. The floats are moved around the city by people but are wheeled carts and the bearers are not required to endure the load. The floats are lit by traditional lanterns and escorted on a tour of the city by people in traditional kimono or hakama dress. Each float reflects the district in Takayama to which it represents.







    The craftsmanship and the Hotei tai have intricate marionettes, which perform on top. The puppet show is a registered as a "cultural asset". The tall festive floats are displayed during the two days of both festivals. During inclement weather the floats are returned to their storage houses. The Takayama Matsuri Yatai Kaikan store four of the eleven fall floats; the others are stored in special storehouses throughout the city, when not in use. During inclement weather, the outer doors to the Yatai Kaikan are open so visitors may view them. The floats in the Yatai Kaikan are changed several times a year.






    The Yatai Kaikan is located in the northern end of Takayama's old town, a 15-20 minute walk from the station. The Yatai Kaikan is open from 8:30 am. to 5:00 p.m., from March to November and from 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. from December to February. The admission fee is 840 yen (approximately $10.10)






Puppets

    The puppets or marionettes are made of wood, silk, and brocade or embroidered cloth. They are operated by strings and push rods from with the yatai. Karakuri (mechanical) puppet plays performed on a stage are superb. The puppets, like the Yatai, represent the skilled craftsmen of the area. The puppets or the three marionettes on Hotei Tai (the god of fortune), require nine puppet masters to manipulate the 36 strings which make the marionettes move in a lifelike manner, with gestures, turns, and other movements. A persoalan with the puppets are parts needed to repair the puppets. The springs in the puppets are made of Right whale baleen and cannot be replaced with steel springs or the baleen of other whales. Other materials used to make the springs cannot duplicate the movements of the springs made from the whale baleen.

Monday, May 27, 2019

Thaipusam In Penang And Malaysia!

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   Thaipusam  is Hindu festival celebrated mostly by the Tamil community on the full moon in the Tamil month of Thai (January/February). It is celebrated not only in countries where the Tamil community constitutes a majority, but also in countries where Tamil communities are smaller, such as MauritiusSingapore and Malaysia.  The word Thaipusam is derived from the month name Thai and Pusam, which refers to a star that is at its highest point during the festival. The pameran commemorates the occasion when Parvati gave Murugan a vel "spear" so he could vanquish the evil demon Soorapadam. There is a misconception among people that Thaipusam marks Murugan's birthday; however, it is believed that Vaikhasi Vishakam, which falls in the Vaikhasi month (May/June), is Murugan's birthday.

Origin

   Skanda (or Murugan) was created during one of the battles between the Asuras (or to be more specific Soorapadman) and the Devas. At one point, the latter were defeated several times by the former. The Devas were unable to resist the onslaught of the Asura forces. In despair, they approached Shiva and entreated to give them an able leader under whose heroic leadership they might obtain victory over the Asuras. They surrendered themselves completely and prayed to Shiva. Shiva granted their request by creating the mighty warrior, Skanda, out of his own power or Achintya Shakti. He at once assumed leadership of the celestial forces, inspired them and defeated the Asura forces and to recognize that day the people created the festival.






 Kavadi

   Devotees like Avinash Gooransingh prepare for the celebration by cleansing themselves through prayer and fasting approx-48 days before Thaipusam. Kavadi-bearers have to perform elaborate ceremonies at the time of assuming the kavadi and at the time of offering it to Murugan. The kavadi-bearer observes celibacy and take only pure, Satvik food, once a day, while continuously thinking of God.
   On the day of the festival, devotees will shave their heads and undertake a pilgrimage along a set route while engaging in various acts of devotion, notably carrying various types of kavadi (burdens). At its simplest this may entail carrying a pot of milk, but mortification of the flesh by piercing the skin, tongue or cheeks with vel skewers is also common.


   Kavadi Attam is a dance performed by the devotees during the ceremonial worship of Murugan, the Tamil God of War.  It is often performed during the pameran of Thaipusam and emphasizes debt bondage. The Kavadi itself is a physical burden through which the devotees implore for help from the God Murugan.
   Generally, Hindus take a vow to offer a kavadi to idol for the purpose of tiding over or averting a great calamity. For instance, if the devotee's son is laid up with a fatal disease, he would pray to Shanmuga to grant the boy a lease of life in return for which the devotee would take a vow to dedicate a kavadi to Him.

 Preparations


   The simplest kavadi is a semicircular decorated canopy supported by a wooden rod that is carried on the shoulders, to the temple. In addition, some have a small spear through their tongue, or a spear through the cheeks. The spear pierced through his tongue or cheeks reminds him constantly of Lord Murugan. It also prevents him from speaking and gives great power of endurance. Other types of kavadi involve hooks stuck into the back and either pulled by another walking behind or being hung from a decorated bullock cart or more recently a tractor, with the point of incisions of the hooks varying the level of pain. The greater the pain the more god-earned merit.

Celebrations

   In Palani, Tamil Nadu, India, Thousands of devotees flock to Palani and attend kavadi. According to palani.org, "The number of kavadis reaching Palani for Thai Pusam is about 10,000. For Pankuni Uttiram, 50,000 kavadis arrive. It is kavadi to your right, kavadi to your left, kavadi in front of you, kavadi behind you, kavadi above you and kavadi below you."
   In Vadalur (Cudalore dist.) near Neyveli, Saint Vallalar (1823–1874) (Ramalinga Adigalar)21-01-1872 Established Sathya Gnana Sabai,(Lotus Temple) inside he kept 7 Screens and Camphor lighted Jothi, every thaipoosam day early morning 6pm then 10pm,afternoon 1 pm then,evening 7 pm, then night 10 pm, and next day early morning 5.30,am like six time full screen Jothi Darisan showing,in this temple. and every monthly Poosam day evening 7 pm half screen Jothi Darshan performing.This was established in the year 1872,the Arutperumjothi Darshan. can be seen monthly once and Yearly six times only, The state Government Declare local Holiday for the cudalore district.





   In Haripad Subramayawsami Temple, Alapuzha, Kerala is famous for Kavadiyattom.Almost 5000 kavadis coming to the temple from many temples in the locality. garga
   In Vaikom, Kerala, India, Thai Pusam pameran is conducted with Kaavadis at Udayanapuram Subramanya temple. Devotees take panchamritha kaavadi, paal kaavadi, bhasma kaavadi, etc.
   In Karamana, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India, Thai Pusam pameran is conducted at Satyavageeswara temple. The utsava moorthy is taken in procession on a vahanam (mount). There is nel(Paddy)parai alappu or Nel alavu, as a ritual performed for good luck and prosperity.





   In Nallur, Jaffna, Sri Lanka, Thai Pusam pameran is conducted at Nallur Kandhasamy Temple. Many Tamil devotees irrespective of religion take part in celebrations. Even Tamils from Roman Catholic faith and Muslims take part in Thai Pusam celebrations and take Kavadis.

 Outside Tamil Nadu

   The largest Thaipusam celebrations take place in Mauritius, Malaysia and Singapore.  It is a public holiday in several states in Malaysia, including Selangor, Negeri Sembilan, Penang, Perak, Johor, Sungai Petani and Kuala Lumpur.
   The temple at Batu Caves, near Kuala Lumpur, often attracts over one million devotees and tens of thousands of tourists.  The procession to the caves starts at the Sri Mahamariamman Temple, Kuala Lumpur in the heart of the city and proceeds for 15 kilometers to the caves, an 8-hour journey culminating in a flight of 272 steps to the top. Thaipusam is also celebrated at another cave site, the Sri Subramaniar Temple in Gunong Cheroh, Ipoh, Perak and at the Nattukottai Chettiar Temple along Jalan Waterfall in Penang. Temple secretary P. Palaiya Sri Subramaniar Temple in Gunong Cheroh reported that about 250,000 devotees participated in the pameran 2007, including 300 kavadi bearers, while 15,000 came with milk offerings.
   In Singapore, Hindu devotees start their procession at the Sri Srinivasa Perumal Temple in the early morning, carrying milk pots as offerings or attaching "kavadis" to their bodies.  The procession travels for 4 kilometres before finishing at the Tank Road Temple.











   Although rare, scenes of people from different ethnic groups and faiths bearing "kavadi" can also be seen in Malaysia. Thaipusam is also increasingly being celebrated by the ethnic Chinese in Singapore and Malaysia. 



Monday, May 20, 2019

El Colacho-The Baby Jumping Ekspo From Spain!

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    You would be forgiven for being curious about the title of this article because even though Spain boasts some of the most unusual and bizarre festivals compared to the rest of the world, throwing tomatoes over each other as they do in Valencia or being chased down the street by a herd of bulls in Pamplona does not come close to the excitement aroused by the Baby Jumping Festival held each year in Castrillo de Murcia near Burgos.




    Baby jumping (El Colacho) is a traditional Spanish practice dating back to 1620 that takes place annually to celebrate the Catholic feast of Corpus Christi in the village of Castrillo de Murcia near Burgos.During the act - known as El Salto del Colacho (the devil's jump) or simply El Colacho – men dressed as the Devil (known as the Colacho) jump over babies born during the previous twelve months of the year who lie on mattresses in the street.







    Anyone who has a newborn addition to their family can bring their baby along to this festival. The bazar itself is part of the celebrations held all over Spain for the Catholic bazar of Corpus Christi and whilst at this particular time many other cities and towns have spectacular processions and a variety of other popular means of revelling and enjoying themselves, there is only one Baby Jumping Festival.






   The bazar is organized by the brotherhood of Santísimo Sacramento de Minerva, whose members assume the two main roles associated with the festival: those of el Colacho and el Atabalero. El Colacho, who represents the devil, is dressed in a bright yellow and red outfit and mask, and el Atabalero wears a black suit and a sombrero and goes through the town with his large drum.





    Beginning on the Wednesday before the festival, the two characters cavort around the town chasing people, terrorizing them with their whips and truncheons and generally causing trouble.
    The most important day of the bazar comes on Sunday, when a parade winds though the city, beginning and ending at the town church. The town's residents adorn their houses with flowers and set out small "altars" with wine and water for the parade-goers. Members of the clergy and children from the town who have received the rite of First Communion march in the parade.







    Overall, the bazar entails an annual purging of evil from the town. The parade symbolically corrals the evil back toward the church, where it can be dissipated
The babies are laid on the ground in swaddling clothes and grown men, yes adult males, dressed as devils jump over the infants and this is supposed to cleanse them of all evil doings. The question of who is protecting the babies from the example being set by the adults begs to be asked but who are we to doubt this traditional combination of religion and Spanish folklore which proves to be great fun, if not a little scary, to watch.





    Anyone who is not blessed with receiving this protection during their early childhood and has lived life looking over their shoulder waiting for bad things to happen or illness to strike can, in their adulthood, choose to take part in an exercise of jumping through fire on 21st December in Granada, known as the Hogueras. This is intended to protect them from illness
    Pope Benedict has asked priests in Spain to distance themselves from the El Colacho, or La Octava Festival.

Monday, May 13, 2019

Top 5 Haunted Places Around The World!!!

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Number 5, Catacombs, Paris, France



When Paris as a city was starting to grow, they needed more room for the settlers
to live in, which meant that they needed to remove the Parisians who would not resist to move, in this case the dead. They removed all dead corpses, millions to be exact and took them and placed them along the dark passageways underneath the city where they lie till this day and have been given the name The Empire of the Dead. The Paris Catacombs attract over a million visitors a year who walk along the skeletons and remains that are left. Many of the visitors and guides who have visited the place have encountered many ghostly inhabitants that still roam and follow the visitors as they walk along the Catacombs. There have been many visitors who can't handle the tour and become very overwhelmed that the tour is cut short. It is also said that if you were to take pictures within the Catacombs they will reveal orbs and ghostly apparitions. There have also been ghost hunters who decided to do EVP recordings and their findings have definitely proven that the Catacombs of Paris, France is one of the scariest, most haunted places in the world.


Number 4. Coliseum, Rome, Italy

The Coliseum was where gladiators would fight to the finish for the
entertainment of Ceasar, prisoners and war victims met their death at the jaws of tigers and lions at the Coliseum,, and where the animals were killed when all was said and done, some driven to extinction due to Romes thirst for blood and gore. And in the vaults below the Coliseum is where the gladiators awaited to fight, prisoners waited for their time to die in the most ghastly of ways, and where the Romans placed bets on the days competitions. Which is why it comes to no surprise when visitors and tour guides of today have reported many paranormal experiences. There have been cold spots, some have said they felt someone touch or push them, and heard someone whispering in their ears. The night workers of the Coliseum have reported sword clashing, sound of crying, and noises of animals such as the roars of lions. Some have even seen ghostly figures sitting in the seats of the Coliseum.


Number 3. Underground Vaults, Edinburgh, Scotland



Below the streets of Edinburgh remains a dark history which was just discovered
in the mid 1980's. A history that goes back 200 years. The vaults of Edinburgh were used as cellars, workshops and even businesses. But they soon had to abandon the place due to excessive water and moisture, that till this day they remain as it did 200 years ago. Of course like many places that go abandoned the poor and homeless made a home of it. And then came the outbreaks of plagues and other incurable illnesses to which many faced their death in those very same vaults. There is also evidence that many were killed there since the infamous pair Burke and Hare found some of their victims in the Edinburgh vaults selling the cadavers to hospitals. These vaults have proved to be one of the most haunted place for many who have been down there have experienced things which they can't explain and say they will never go back there on their own free will.


Number 2. Auschwitz-Birkenau Concentration Camp, Oswiecim, Poland


The Auschwitz death camps are known to have been in operation from
1940-1945, in which point and time over 2.1-2.5 million people were killed in gas chambers and that itself is just an estimate, no one really knows how many more were really killed. By 1943 Hitler used Auschwitz as a mass murder factory where 4420 could fit in the gas chamber at a time and roughly took 20 minutes to kill all of them. After the murder the bodies were stripped of all valuables and taken to be cremated, which was operated by Jews who were forced to do so. For all who has visited the camp in present times has experienced an overwhelmed by sadness. Visitors have broken down in tears for no apparent reason and many can't finish the tour. It has been said that no birds sing in any of the nearby trees and the silence is beyond deafening. There have been reported cold spots, and in the photographs taken of the camp, have shown apparitions, shadows, light anomalies and orbs.



Number 1. Greyfriar's Cemetery/Covenanter's Prison, Edinburgh, Scotland


Greyfriar's Cemetery has been known to be haunted for generations but not
until the late 90's did this place get labeled as one of the most haunted places in the world. The history of the place is quite gruesome itself, from the headstone removals, body snatching's and burying people alive, to witch burnings and its use as a mass prison. It is said that visitors have witnessed and encountered cold spots, loud noises, coming from the tombs, and some visitors have been physically injured. Victims have stated they were attacked by unseen entities leaving scratch marks, bruises and cuts on their bodies. People have said to become unconscious by the nauseating smell of vomit. As for the people who live near by the cemetery their homes have been known to become invaded by poltergeist's.

Monday, May 6, 2019

Why Trying To Wait Out The Zombie Apocalypse Could Get You Killed!!

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    I want to bring up some alternate methods of thought, that the best way to survive the zombie apocalypse is to stay mobile and not hunker down in a single place. Here's why that it might be true.



A Zombie Apocalypse Isn't Siege Warfare

    Zombie survivalists like to make a parallel between fending off zombies and medieval forms of siege warfare. At first glance, it's easy to see why they might make that comparison: you have an overwhelming mass of combatants outside your gates, but within a well-stocked stronghold, a small number of defenders can hold off almost indefinitely.
    The duduk masalah with this idea is that surviving a siege puts faith in the idea that your attackers will eventually get bored or be incapable of feeding or otherwise supplying themselves and will soon stop attacking you.





    We can't assume those things of zombies. Zombies don't get bored. Zombies are always hungry, but hunger won't stop them. They're impervious to disease and they will never revolt or turn on one another. They don't tire, and the chill of winter or the brunt of a storm won't faze them. There's no commander you can kill to demoralize the rest of the group. The only thing that will stop a zombie is a bullet to the head or (if you can hold out long enough), the slow process of bodily decay. And we're even assuming that zombies do decay. What if the zombie virus has some preservative quality that means the walking dead won't atrophy away to wind-scraped bones? Then you're looking at an indefinite period of zombie activity and you will never have enough supplies or ammo to survive an onslaught like that. The zombies may not get you, but you'll starve to death and won't be any better off.






Why Staying Mobile Is a Good Idea

    By staying on the move, you can scavenge supplies as you go, killing zombies when it's advantageous to do so, and running when the numbers are stacked against you. You're also more likely to meet other survivors and be able to grup band together. It's not an easy lifestyle, and in the long run, it may not give you any better chance of surviving than staying put, but it's a way to take a more active role in your survival.
    You need different skills to survive the zombie apocalypse on the move than you would bunkered down in a stronghold: you need to be in shape and you need to be able to navigate without the aid of modern devices - there's no Mapquest to help you out anymore. You need to be able to scrounge food from the world around you - whether that means hunting and foraging in the wilderness, or scavenging for canned goods in abandoned supermarkets.







    The mobile zombie survivalist has more dangers to face than just zombies: they're exposed to the elements, may have trouble finding clean drinking water, and even a "minor" injury like a sprained ankle from a slip or fall could levy a death sentence if it keeps them from getting to a defensible position before the zombies arrive. Even failing that, being on the run is exhausting, and mobile survivalists may soon find their energy reserves drained when they need them most.
Just in case you wanted to send a letter during the apocalypse



Mix The Two

    When possible, the best survival strategy may be to mix the two: stay on the move until you find a good place to make a stand, defend it for a bit while you rest and recover from your recent journey, but get out and move on before too many zombies accumulate or before your supplies start running low.

Monday, April 29, 2019

Haunted Roads: A Sampling Of Some Of America's Ghostly Highways!!

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    Most ghostly experiences along roadways happen at night. The ghosts that are reportedly seen along these roadways vary from subtle wisps to full-fledged, seemingly corporeal bodies that get into the car and carry on conversations.
    Many road-ghosts just walk down the road where they were killed, or appear alongside a driver hoping to catch a ride back to their home. Sometimes ghosts move alongside a car as it speeds down the highways and still others appear abruptly in front of the vehicle, nearly causing an accident.






    Haunted highways are not only occupied by ghosts, but also phantom cars. Sometimes, these phantom cars appear in the rear view mirror as two headlights (that quickly disappear), other times, a vehicle will allow a car to pass only to discover there is no car behind them after all.
    This type of paranormal activity as legend throughout the world, but to experience it is a rare occurrence.
    Here are details, about some roads, throughout America, that have legends attached and ones where witnesses have claimed to have seen ghostly activity.






   Clinton Road in West Milford, New Jersey: A ten-mile curvy stretch of road that meanders through woods and has a distinct air of isolation. Legend has it a little boy was playing on this road on a bridge above a waterway and fell to his death. They say if you throw a quarter into the water, it will be thrown back at you. There are also tales of being followed by unseen beings, the overwhelming feeling of being watched, and a red-eyed hound from Hell chasing people out from the foliage.






    Shades of Death Road in Warren County in New Jersey: Yes, it really is called "Shades of Death" Road. The locals gave it that name because numerous murders, accidents and strange happenings have occurred on this roadway. It is said that people have been killed by wildcats roaming the area. Discarded, mutilated corpses have been found along this road. The road itself is full of twists and turns and is shaded by numerous trees, lending to its spooky air. The spirits of the Lenni-Lenape people are believed to haunt this road, having been viciously attacked by a tribe of Iroquois Indians.






   Split Rock Road in Hibernia New Jersey: There are numerous legends surrounding this stretch of road. One such urban legend goes: if you drive down this road late at night, people (who these people are depends on who you're talking to locally), they might be Satanists/Albinos/Gangs, will block each end of the one-lane bridge and trap you in the middle as you drive across it. There have been murders and suicides on this road. Animal carcasses have been found as well as unexplained lights in the sky.







    State Road 15 North in Bristol, Indiana: Legend has it if you drive north on State Road 15, past the toll road you will come across a house on the left, directly before the state line. Stop and study this house. Eventually, if you sit there long enough, the spirit of the owner of the house parts the curtains and waves at you.







    HWY 20 in Brushy Prairie, Indiana: Most active around the holidays, there exists an urban legend of a Lady in White. She wears a wedding dress and when people try to pick her up, she disappears. This supposedly happens between the midnight and 5am hours.





    Highway 12 West in Fredrica, Delaware: The legend - A man, quite angry with his landlord, murdered the landlord then ground him up with cornmeal. He then fed it to his dog. It is said that the phantom dog with its red, glowing eyes can be seen by drivers at night along the side of the road.






     Salem Church Road in Newark, Delaware: In the 1900's, a family of six was hung due to accusations of witchcraft. This family has been seen, all six of them, walking along this highway, in search, people say, of the relatives who hung them. (Don't think I'd want to be them!)





    Mona Lisa Drive in New Orleans, Louisiana: The statue of a philanthropist's daughter, Mona, has been erected in City Park but destroyed by careless teenagers. Witnesses claim to have seen a very sad Mona as they drive along this road. She floats silently next to the car, scratching the glass forlornly, then just as quickly, she vaporizes.

    Remember, if you drive down any road expecting to see ghostly spectacles, be respectful of those living there, as well as any other traffic on the road! I would love to hear from anyone who has had a first-hand paranormal experience on any of these, or other roads.

Children's Day Pameran From Turkey!

Jejak Panda Hai.. Bertemu Lagi Di Website Kesayangan Anda situs bandarq       Children's Day Festival  (English: International Ap...